— Bermuda —

A few things we thought you might like to know...

Although commonly referred to in the singular, Bermuda consists of approximately 138 islands with a total area of 20.6 sq. miles. Located in the North Atlantic Ocean, roughly 580 nautical miles east-southeast of Cape Hatteras on the Outer Banks of North Carolina and roughly 590 nautical miles southeast of Martha’s Vineyard, Bermuda has two incorporated municipalities: the City of Hamilton and the Town of St. George. It’s subtropical climate is warmed by the nearby Gulf Stream, thanks to the westerly’s, which carry warm, humid air eastwards over Bermuda, helping to keep winter temperatures above freezing. The summertime heat index can be high due to the humidity even though mid-August temperatures rarely exceed 86°F (30°C). Atlantic winter storms, often associated with cold fronts which bring arctic air masses, can produce powerful, gusting winds and heavy rain.

Bermuda has a highly affluent economy with a large financial sector and tourism industry giving it the world’s highest GDP per capita in 2005. The population is 65,365 (July 2005 est). Approximately 25% of the resident population are foreign-born working in Bermuda and come from the UK, USA, Azores, Portugal, Canada, Philippines and other Asian countries, as well as the Caribbean. The official language is English; however, with a larger Portuguese presence in Bermuda, that language is also prevalent.

Some 400,000 people holiday in Bermuda, most of them from the east coast of the U.S. Bermuda offers a variety of shopping experiences that start on Front Street and commence along Queen, Reid and other small streets in the City of Hamilton. Spend the day in St. George's or Dockyard as they offer unique boutique shops featuring local artists as well. Bermuda has a varied selection of restaurants from which to choose and dining out can be expensive and elegant, as well as casual and inexpensive. There are gourmet restaurants of the four-star category, simple home-style establishments, English pubs and a variety of international cuisine.

Bermuda offers an array of exquisite beaches of pink and turquoise water. The beaches are pink because the sand contains pink flecks that are the remains of a tiny organism known as red foam. This combined with tiny particles of broken shells and bits of coral create the pink hue of Bermuda’s beautiful beaches.

With 400 years of history, we have beautifully-restored reminders everywhere, from the Museums and historic houses to our forts and Royal Naval Dockyard.

Bermuda has produced, or been home, to actors such as Earl Cameron, Diana Dill, and most famously, Michael Douglas and Catherine Zeta-Jones. Dance and music are important in Bermuda. Music and dramatic festivals bring in some of the best R&B, Soca and Reggae singers, jazz musicians, dance troupes and period performers. The dances of the colourful Gombey Dancers, seen at many local events, are wild and fun as they move to the rhythm. Noted musicians from Bermuda have included local icons The Talbot Brothers, who performed for many decades in both Bermuda and the United States (and appeared on Ed Sullivan’s televised variety show), jazz pianist Lance Hayward, pop singer Heather Nova and more recently Collie Buddz.

Bermuda shorts originated with the British Army for wear in tropical and desert climates, and they are still worn by the Royal Navy. Available in a wide variety of colours, including many pastel shades, these short trousers are widely worn in Bermuda as appropriate business attire by men and are co-ordinated with knee-length socks, a dress shirt, tie and blazer.

Of course, Bermuda’s largest export – and the one known around the world – is Gosling’s Bermuda Rum, produced here since 1850, and still going strong. Mixing Gosling’s Black Seal Rum with Gosling’s Stormy Ginger Beer makes the trademarked and National Drink of Bermuda, the Dark ‘n Stormy®.

For more information about Bermuda please visit the Bermuda Department of Tourism website: www.BermudaTourism.com

     
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